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Kristen Bell's Instagram hacked by daughter

Kristen Bell's young daughter shared the first-ever photo of herself after accidentally hacking into her mum's phone.

The Frozen star is mum to two girls, 20-month-old Delta and three-year-old Lincoln, and it seems the older sibling has gotten a head start when it comes to sharing selfies on social media.


On Thursday (25Aug16), the toddler published an Instagram "story", which is a secondary feed of either pictures or videos that is available for only 24 hours from the time of posting.


In the short snap, a blonde-haired toddler, who appears to be Lincoln, is looking straight down into the camera, as the lens captures what appears to be the actress' house shown from the ground up.


While Kristen has yet to comment publicly on the accidental post, she previously made it clear she and her husband Dax Shepard wouldn't be sharing any public photos of her kids until they choose to do so.


In an interview on comedienne Ellen DeGeneres' chat show in 2013, shortly after Lincoln was born, Kristen ironically said, "We're not quite positive that she wants to be a public figure yet, so we're going to leave that up to her. If she wants to, she can do a bunch of selfies. Who cares? But we're just going to make that decision for her."


The following year (14), the mum also spearheaded a No Kids Policy campaign, calling on fans to boycott any magazine that run photos of celebrities' children.


She tweeted at the time, "I wont do interviews 4 (sic) entities that pay photogs to take pics of my baby anymore. I care more about my integrity & my values (sic) than my career. The 'look at the celebs kid at the park!' teaches us a disengaged voyeurism. think abt (sic) how being followed by photos all day effects (sic) THE KID.'


"Now think about how you play the MOST NECESSARY role in the sad chain of events-the consumer. Things won’t change till the consumer does."


Kristen and Dax garnered support from many fans and celebrity parents, and the collective effort helped to convince editors at a slew of top publications to curb their use of such pictures.