• Mark Cuban

    The business mogul & "Shark Tank" star reveals his favorite quotes and his number one piece of business advice.

    WATCH NOW
  • Kevin O'Leary

    The "Shark Tank" star discusses his deal with QVC and his appearance on DJ Khaled's Snapchat

    WATCH NOW
  • Robert Herjavec

    The businessman talks Season 8 of "Shark Tank" and what type of car each of his co-investors would be.

    WATCH NOW
  • Dirty 30

    Grace Helbig, Hannah Hart, & Mamrie Hart discuss their party comedy and play Two Truths and a Lie.

    WATCH NOW

The Scene

SUNDAY MUSIC VIDS: George Michael
Journalists Asking the Questions Millennials Want To Hear

The musician says he copyrighted his single in 1998 and submitted demo material to Interscope Records, UMG Recordings and EMI over a period of 10 years. He alleges the music executives admitted receiving the demos, but had no interest in signing him as an artist.

Bryan Pringle's case comes on the same day a suit against the group dating back to January (10) was refiled; musician Phoenix Phenom launched a copyright infringement case against the band, alleging the rhythm and lyrics from her track Boom Dynamite were copied in their hit Boom Boom Pow.

The documents for both cases, which are being handled by the same law firm, allege UMG Recordings, Interscope Records and members of the Black Eyed Peas engaged in "a pattern and practice of intentional copyright infringement with respect to the unlawful copying of songs of unknown or lesser-known artists".

The suit seek damages, including all net profits received by the defendants as a result of the two songs, as well as future credits and royalty payments.