• Skeet Ulrich

    Actor discusses his role in hit CW drama "Riverdale" and bonding with his on-screen son, Cole Sprouse.

    WATCH NOW
  • Andy Grammer

    We challenge the "Smoke Clears" singer to a Twitter grammar game to see if he lives up to his last name.

    WATCH NOW
  • Garrett Hedlund

    Guessing emotions as 'Mudbound' actor reads tweets from the likes of Anna Kendrick, Kristen Bell, and more.

    WATCH NOW
  • Olivia Holt

    Backstage at Westfield Century City's Live at the Atrium concert event with the actress/singer.

    WATCH NOW

 
 
 

Kutcher is adamant lovers need to embrace the digital age, because sending a text message or a Twitter post is a "modern whisper in your lover's ear" and comparable to "sending flowers to the office".

He writes, "Whether you like it or not, the digital age has produced a new format for modern romance, and natural selection may be favouring the quick-thumbed quip peddler over the confident, ice-breaking alpha-male. Sending sweet nothings on Twitter and Facebook is also fun. In some ways, it's no different than sending flowers to the office: You are declaring your love for everyone to see.

"Who doesn't like to be publicly adored? Just remember that what you post is out there and there's some stuff you can't unsee."

But Kutcher warns couples not to forgo face-to-face human contact completely, adding: "The reality is that we communicate with every part of our being, and there are times when we must use it all. When someone needs us, he or she needs all of us. There's no text that can replace a loving touch when someone we love is hurting...

"(And) the power of a handwritten letter is greater than ever. It's personal and deliberate and means more than an email or text ever will. It has a unique scent."